(The Weather Network)

Wet weather expected for much of coastal B.C.

The Weather Network is calling for up to 200mm of rain to fall in some areas of the South Coast and Vancouver Island

Enjoy any blue sky you can find because it will soon turn cloudy as up to 200mm of rain is expected to fall along the South Coast and Vancouver Island between now and the end of the week.

Starting Tuesday, meteorologists at The Weather Network are calling for heavy rains across the Coastal Mountains, West Vancouver Island and the Squamish region. This excessive rainfall is expected to melt the already existing snow at an accelerated rate, causing rivers to run high and increase the risk of avalanches and landslides as the snowpack becomes unstable.

(Video by Curtis Kreklau)

The rain showers are being caused by a deep layer of tropical moisture that will usher in milder air, and with it, rain. As freezing levels rise — the point where falling snow turns to rain — many of the typically snowy ski hills will instead see rainfall beginning on Tuesday.

There are no major storms expected this week, but an unsettling pattern will continue into Saturday and Sunday. Temperatures will become above seasonal, but snow levels will drop back to normal levels of between 1200-1500 metres.

Looking further into the forecast for the 2017/18 Winter season, Canadians should expect a wild ride, says Chief Meteorologist Chris Scott

“It’s safe to say we’ll all be participating in winter this year.”

British Columbia is expected to see near normal temperatures in most areas, with the winter chill biting into those residents living in the eastern portion of the province. Overall, officials say this winter will not be as persistent or as severe as it was last year, especially for areas near the coast. They also expect the extended periods of cold weather to be more likely to happen during the second half of the winter season, with milder conditions through the end of 2017.

For anyone hoping for an early Spring, previous years showing these similar global weather patterns — such as a developing La Niña — typically means that spring does not come early.



ragnar.haagen@bpdigital.ca

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(The Weather Network)

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