BORN AND RAISED: Valley offers a beach for every stage of life

By Katie Maximack

When you grow up on the ocean, your favourite local beaches tend to change as your life does.

As a kid, you likely prefer the sandy beaches, where you can build sky-high sand castles with deep moats, sand dollar windows, and wooden-stick soldiers. You can run into the water not having to worry about cutting open your feet on barnacled rock, and you can try to dig up and catch a geoduck – if you’re lucky.

As a teenager, you might tend to gravitate to beaches where you’re away from the prying eyes of curious adults; where you can meet up with your friends from school, listen to music and hang out with a fire (and hopefully mingle responsibly).

As an adult, I’m discovering that your favourite local beach can depend on a lot of things, like whether or not you have kids, want a fire or just want some peace and quiet.

In the Comox Valley (and even just beyond), there are enough options for everyone.

There’s the rocky Goose Spit and Seal Bay for dog walkers and beach strollers; there’s Airforce Beach and Kye Bay for the sand lovers and wakeboarders; there’s Point Holmes for parkers and seal watchers, and Comox Lake for boaters and dock jumpers; and that’s only naming some of our local beaches.

For me, I’ve loved all of those places at one point as I’ve grown up in the Valley these past 30-something years, but lately I’ve even surprised myself with what’s become my go-to beach in the area.

Normally I would gravitate to the Goose Spit because it’s the closest to my home and a great place to grab a coffee and a catch-up with a friend. Lately, however, it’s been a little too busy for me, buzzing with people with their own coffees and catch-ups, as well as the influx of stair climbers eager for a good workout (good for them though).

So I started to make the drive out to Airforce Beach, excited by the idea of sandy stretches and a cold beer afterwards on the Griffin Pub’s patio – then I remembered they now charge admission for that sandiest stretch of beach in the Valley. Sorry, Airforce Beach, you shouldn’t be able to charge us to enjoy the sand. It’s business savvy, yes, but also cruel to those who maybe can’t afford your “parking pass.”

One day, after refusing to pay at Airforce, my husband and I went for a drive looking for more options nearby, and that’s when I rediscovered Kin Beach, a place I hadn’t seen since my childhood.

It was nestled between cheerful campers on one end and picnic tables on the other. It was quiet, save for maybe the laughter of kids playing on the nearby playground. Across a stretch of green grass, cut neatly by a winding worn path, was the ocean, hugged by large rocks smattered with seaweed and aged driftwood.

It wasn’t groomed with neatly lined log walls and feature rocks, nor was it graced with a kilometre of soft sand, but it was still beautiful in its own right.

More importantly, it was peaceful. It was a place where we could just sit on a log and chat quietly, staring out towards Powell River watching boats go by.

We didn’t have to avoid piles of dog feces or pay money to park there, and we didn’t have to dodge traffic to get back to our Jeep. It was a nice change, and one I realized that I needed at this stage in my life.

We all have our go-to beaches here in the Comox Valley, and I know my current love affair with Kin Beach could change when my next stage of life comes along (likely with children), and that’s okay.

The bottom line is we’re lucky to live here and have so many favourite beaches – and swimming holes, plenty enough to carry us through all of the stages of our lives.

 

 

Katie Maximick is a freelance writer for the Comox Valley Record. Her Born and Raised column appears regularly.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Comox Valley RCMP impound six vehicles in six days in May

All drivers were found to be going at least 47 km/h over the speed limit

Cumberland water plant costs come in higher than planned

Extra costs result of delays, Hydro requirements and right of way access

Boil water notice lifted in Union Bay

The notice has been lifted as of May 27.

Tsolum River Restoration Society members keeping busy during COVID-19 times

Young fish can get stranded in the most unlikely of places

Police looking for witnesses to Courtenay bear spray assault

The incident took place Tuesday, May 26 at around 8:30 p.m.

Only four new COVID-19 cases, 228 active across B.C.

Health officials watching as activities ramp up

Comox Valley business map offers information on local eateries, grocery stores and more

Search and click for hours and services offered during the COVID-19 pandemic

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

RCMP told of alleged assault in Courtenay hours after the fact

Police only made aware of possible attack through social media posts

Feds looking at ways to reunite families amid COVID-19 border restrictions with U.S.

Some families with members of dual-citizenship have become separated due to the pandemic

B.C. aquaculture farm’s employees sweat it out to raise funds for food banks

For every five minutes of exercise recorded, Cermaq Canada is donating a dollar to local food banks in communities they operate

Condition in kids with possible COVID-19 link being studied in Canada

This month, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued an alert to doctors about MIS-C

‘I knew what he wanted’: Kootenay man spends hours in tree as black bear patrols below

Francis Levasseur is no stranger to the outdoors, but a recent run-in with a bear caused quite a scare

COVID cancelled their wedding plans, so they married on a BC mountaintop

Ceremony was live streamed to friends and family around the world

Most Read