Commen-Terry: Losing my locks for the children

Head-shaving fund"razor" for Tour de Rock

Terry Farrell

Record staff

The annual Cops For Cancer Tour de Rock rolls into the Comox Valley this week, bringing the evil disease to the forefront once again.

There are very few adults who can say cancer has not touched their lives in some fashion. It plays no favourites. It chooses no battles. It’s one of the most baffling diseases in the world, because it can strike, seemingly without cause, and certainly without prejudice.

Indeed, there are certain catalysts for certain cancers, but the most baffling types of all are the forms of cancer that strike children.

There is rarely an answer to the question “why my daughter?” or “why my son?” and the journey that follows can be the most frightful period for not only the child, but the entire family.

I speak from experience. My youngest sister was struck with an unusual form of cancer when she was 12 years old. I was 14 at the time and was not completely in tune with what was happening. I do remember spending a night at home, sitting on the couch, while my mom and dad stayed at the hospital, awaiting the doctor to emerge from a 20-hour surgery.

I was confused, and terrified, and I wasn’t even the patient. I will never be able to comprehend what my sister went through at that time, or how it affected and shaped the rest of her life to this day. Yes, she beat cancer.

She is one of the lucky ones. And her experience epitomizes what the Tour de Rock is all about.

The Tour de Rock is a two-week, 1,000-kilometre bike ride for a team of police officers who raise money to support children who are fighting this awful disease. Since its first ride, in 1998, the TDR has raised more than $21 million for pediatric cancer research and support programs. I’d like to add to that total, and you can help. So here’s the deal: I am willing to part with my last few locks, in the name of Tour de Rock, but my hair isn’t going down without a fight.

Let’s see if, together, we can raise $1,000 for this epic head shave.

Oh, sure, you say “Farrell, you hardly have any hair anyway.”

That’s the point. If I still had a lot, it wouldn’t be worth as much.

Also, I can tell you from experience that, generally, once my hair falls out, it doesn’t come back, so I am taking a real risk of this new look I will be adopting Thursday, Sept. 29 becoming the new permanent me.

And yes, Mrs. Editor is totally on board with the challenge.

In fact, it took her next to no time at all to agree with the idea.

“Think of all the money we will save in shampoo,” she deadpanned, when I told her of my idea. “Plus, you were due for a trim, anyway. Your hair is getting totally out of control.”

She’s right. I can’t do a darn thing with it anymore. In fact, there are days when it’s not even dry by the time I get out of the shower!

So, there you have it, friends, peers, coworkers and professional acquaintances. Please, don’t be shy with your contribution. Pledging is easy. Just follow the instructions at http://www.blackpress4good.com/61AUr3

Let’s get this campaign to $1,000.

And come out to Thrifty Foods Courtenay, downtown location (660 England Ave.) Thursday morning for a Comox Valley Record  Caring for

a Cause Breakfast, and to see me lose the last of my hair. Tears will be shed. Please help out in any way you can. Do it for the kids.

 

 

 

Terry Farrell is the editor of The Comox Valley Record

 

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