Comox Valley motorists not reading all of the cycling signs

Dear editor,

Mr. Hawkins expresses his dismay with the seemingly disproportionate number of 'redundant' bike lane signs in Comox.

Dear editor,

In Wednesday’s edition of the Comox Valley Record, Mr. Hawkins expresses his dismay with the seemingly disproportionate number of ‘redundant’ bike lane signs in Comox.

While I agree with Mr. Hawkins if his point is in regard to sign pollution, I really don’t think that anyone is a proponent of that, one has to ponder what options the Town administrators have when it comes to providing designated safe passage for our pedestrians and cyclists.

A case in point; the Town of Comox staff and council recently responded to a petition last fall that asked for the Town to provide safe passage for our children attending Robb Road school. Through their initiative we now have an improved crossing at the very busy corner of Robb and Anderton.

You would think that the newly brightly painted roadway, newly installed centre median and large new ‘school crossing’ and ‘no passing’ SIGNS would clearly indicate single-lane traffic on Anderton; not to mention that to get a B.C. driver’s licence you would have to know that it is illegal to pass on the right.

But no.

On the second day of school, the RCMP was busy handing out $165 tickets for people who continue to disregard the safety of others by passing on the right, at clearly marked crosswalks and through clearly designated bike lanes.

The irony is that while the police officer was writing one driver a ticket, two cars passed me on the right at the very crosswalk as I was awaiting to turn left. Which leads me to believe that people really do not have a clue that passing on the right is dangerous and illegal or they can’t read — which then also supports Mr. Hawkins position.

Maybe you are right, Mr. Hawkins; we should remove the redundant signage throughout the Town, since no one seems to read them anyway, and instead have everyone retake their drivers test on an annual basis.

Drivers. Here are some viable options to get you to your destination on time and allow for obeying traffic safety laws:

• Leave your house 10 minutes earlier.

• Find a different route to your destination (a $165 fine buys a lot of gas!).

• Take the bus.

Ride your bike to where you’re going.

• Walk.

Stop playing Russian roulette with your cars and our kids, people. Stop passing on the right!

When people adhere to the basic safety rules of the road, Mr. Hawkins, I’ll help you to lead the petition to remove all of those unsightly signs.

Tom Beshr,

Comox

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