EDITORIAL: Keep kids safe

Canada's gun laws make it tougher to acquire firearms

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s hard not to be moved by the heart-wrenching scenes played out in the news coverage of the horrific mass shooting at an elementary school in Connecticut.

The notion of a resolute gunman walking into a classroom and executing young innocent children, their teachers and principal is beyond comprehension. It shatters our very idea of school as a place of nurturing, learning and safety.

Sadly, it’s not the first time it’s happened. It likely won’t be the last.

It’s hard to know what goes through the mind of someone who could do such a crime; most end up killing themselves as their final act of violence. The stories about them that emerge afterward often paint a picture of pained outcasts enduring some sort of mental illness or anguish.

Tortured by their own dark thoughts some eventually snap, lashing out at whatever or whomever they perceive to be the cause of their pain. In America, where guns can be bought over the counter at the local Walmart, that can involve bullets and bloodshed.

Fortunately we aren’t quite so liberal when it comes to firearms.

To acquire a handgun or other restricted firearm, Canadians must first obtain a possession and acquisition licence which requires a firearms safety certificate, references, a guarantor and a detailed personal history.

The bureaucratic process alone is enough to dissuade an impulsive gun purchase. Not that there isn’t an underground market for those with nefarious intentions. It’s unlikely criminals file paperwork.

But the more difficult it is to acquire guns legally, the fewer guns are out there. And that makes it less likely some of those guns will eventually end up in the wrong hands illegally.

 

– Burnaby NewsLeader

 

 

Just Posted

Pride Society of the Comox Valley set to kick off week-long celebration

The organization is celebrating Pride Week with a variety of events to bring the community together.

Work continues on Courtenay’s 4th Street Improvement Project

4th street will be closed to traffic between Duncan and Cliffe Avenue

Inside the music: step behind the curtain at the venerable Vancouver Island Music Festival

Big Read: VIMF in the Comox Valley exemplifies the spirit of an Island summer music festival

Cannabis facility planned in Courtenay

Design up to 100,000 square feet

Major private donation to Kus-kus-sum project

Frank and Bobbi Denton, longtime residents of the Comox Valley, have donated… Continue reading

BC Games: Day 3 wrap and closing ceremonies

The torch in the Cowichan Valley has been extinguished as Fort St. John gets ready to host the 2020 BC Winter Games

Bob Castle’s Under the Glacier cartoon for July 19, 2018

Bob Castle’s Under the Glacier cartoon for July 19, 2018… Continue reading

Police confirm girl, 8 others injured in Toronto shooting; shooter dead

Paramedics said many of the victims in Danforth, including a child, were rushed to trauma centres

Why do they do it? Coaches guide kids to wins, personal bests at the BC Games

Behind the 2,300 B.C. athletes are the 450 coaches who dedicate time to help train, compete

Government sets full-time salary range for Justin Trudeau’s nanny

At its top range, the order works out to a rate of $21.79 per hour, assuming a 40-hour work week

Lower Mainland teams battle for baseball gold at BC Games

Vancouver Coastal squeaked out a 3-2 win against Fraser Valley

The Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw people signed an agreement-in-principle with the B.C. government

The signing ceremony, at the Eliza Archie Memorial School, was 25 years in the making

Canada to resettle dozens of White Helmets and their families from Syria

There are fears the volunteers would become a target for government troops

Francesco Molinari wins British Open at Carnoustie

It is his first win at a major and the first by an Italian

Most Read