Fletcher misinterprets judge’s decision

Dear editor,

With respect to Tom Fletcher’s opinion piece on the class action suit brought against BC Hydro not being approved by Judge Adair.  Judge Adair’s decision not to certify the class action suit brings forth the fact that the foundational argument of the case survived the attack by BC Hydro.

The court found merit and plausibility in the success of a cause of action which embodied the Charter of Rights, Section 7 Liberty Interest.

In short, the court recognized the right to be free from government interference regarding choices of a fundamental and personal nature within one’s home was a valid argument. Now that’s a success that we would not have achieved without this class action application.

The court’s recognition of the Section 7 Liberty Interest as it relates to forced smart meter application and unacceptable microwave radiation emissions exposure there from is a major development and a big step up the stairway to success.

It is important to note that the decision did not assert that the microwave radiation emissions from smart meters is safe. Tom, you got it wrong there, and because the Notice of Civil Claim against BC Hydro was filed in 2013, recent and even more credible science is reporting the possibility of devastating ill health effects from wireless exposure. Such articles, which would have further supported health concerns, were released after the court had closed submissions. We could have really put forth a better case if the recent science had been able to be used. The latest being the U.S. National Toxicology Program science article on brain and heart cancers from two years intermittent “cell phone” exposure. (http://biorxiv.org/content/early/2016/05/26/055699 ).

I feel that Tom was rude in saying that Sharon Noble was a protester when she is a lot more than that. She is the director for the Coalition to Stop Smart Meters here in B.C. – a group I proudly say I am a member of.

Sharon devotes her time doing her own research into credible studies by credible scientists. Nomi Davis is not just a yoga instructor but an extremely successful business woman.

Kathy Read

Agassiz

 

 

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