In defence of Comox council

Dear editor,

First, I wish to commend Erin Haluschak for a well-balanced article in this paper a few weeks ago regarding the Shakesides building issue.  Erin’s piece covered the topic well and avoided the emotional issues that always seem to cloud sound decision-making on issues like this.  Secondly, I would like to applaud the prescient citizens of Comox, who had the very good sense to elect a council with foresight, steadiness and a remarkable capability to make sound decisions for our town, despite the spiteful and ill-informed rhetoric that has emanated from some sources.

Our town is gradually transforming into a jewel, one that is nationally recognized, but letters to this and other papers, along with insufferable and prejudiced websites have consistently pilloried this council and its members, who are quietly doing their duty on behalf of the silent majority.

Whilst dissension and open dialogue are certainly a necessary part of our democracy, when people resort to openly “critiquing the performer instead of the performance,” with name-calling and vindictive dialogue, we quickly devolve to the Donald Trump method of conflict resolution – and we all see how that is working out.

I totally get why people might not understand why or how decisions are made at the municipal level, but what ever happened to writing a letter or sending an e-mail to the individual representative, instead of venting one’s spleen through the media?  It achieves little, except perhaps letting others know just how narrow-minded and parochial some people can be.

A recent letter with a pathetic report card format critiqued the council for a lack of progress in the Town’s rebuilding and rejuvenation process whilst simultaneously castigating them for their failure to protect “sacred” trees and derelict buildings whilst doing it! Incredibly, other groups have tried to blame the current council for trying to rectify situations created by decisions taken many years ago by other councils, such as the Shakesides issue.

It seems to me to be a miracle that we have good folks stand for these municipal positions at all. I have a couple of suggestions for those who would see public carping and moaning as the way to improve things. First, attend a couple of council meetings, or at least watch them on-line. You will see that this is not easy work. Or even better, put your name in the hat to run for these positions — you will see just how much work and personal effort that actually takes.

Secondly, if you have a valid critique on an issue, propose it in a constructive manner with options, it will go much further than personal attacks.

Finally, you should also pay heed to some advice your mother told you: “If you have nothing nice to say, say nothing.”

Elections are coming up soon enough, you can make your views known then.  It’s a shame that all that energy is wasted on being negative, when there is so much to do.

Terry Chester

Comox

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Danita Bilozaze and her daughter Dani in Comox. Photo by Karen McKinnon
Valley woman makes historic name change for truth and reconciliation

First in Canada to be issued new passport under the TRC Calls to Action

For Leela Harrop, the recent death of her brother Raju Tiwari pushed her to sign up for the vaccine. Photo supplied
Comox woman on fence books vaccine due to brother’s death

Leela Harrop says she did have issues with signing up online this past week

Most categories of crime held steady from year to year in Cumberland. File photo
Cumberland crime numbers hold steady year to year

A few categories had notable changes but many were similar to 2019

The colourful Taylor’s Checkerspot butterfly has been reintroduced on Hornby Island, BC. Photo courtesy the Taylor’s Checkerspot Butterfly Recovery Project.
Checkerspot Butterfly Recovery Project releases more caterpillars on Hornby Island

Chris Junck Special to Black Press The number of Taylor’s checkerspot butterflies… Continue reading

Paper Excellence took over Catalyst Paper operations in B.C. in 2018. (Paper Excellence photo)
Russ Ball (left) and some of the team show off the specimen after they were able to remove it Friday. Photo supplied
Courtenay fossil hunter finds ancient turtle on local river

The specimen will now make its home at the Royal BC Museum

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

The following is a list of restaurants offering take-out and patio dining. ADOBE STOCK IMAGE
List of Comox Valley restaurants offering take-out, patio dining options

Restaurants in the Comox Valley continue to adapt to government-imposed restrictions in… Continue reading

AstraZeneca vaccine is becoming available at B.C. pharmacies outside the Lower Mainland, as of Friday, April 9. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Augstein
Canadian doctors say lowering age cutoff for AstraZeneca vaccine makes sense as cases surge

Dr. Susy Hota, medical director of infection prevention and control at Toronto’s University Health Network, said she would also support dropping the age limit

Pall Bearers carrying the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh, followed by the Prince of Wales, left and Princess Anne, right, into St George’s Chapel for his funeral, at Windsor Castle, in Windsor, England, Saturday April 17, 2021. (Danny Lawson/Pool via AP)
Trudeau announces $200K donation to Duke of Edinburgh award as Prince Philip laid to rest

A tribute to the late prince’s ‘remarkable life and his selfless service,’ the Prime Minister said Saturday

B.C. homeowners are being urged to take steps to prepare for the possibility of a flood by moving equipment and other assets to higher ground. (J.R. Rardon)
‘Entire province faces risk’: B.C. citizens urged to prepare for above-average spring flooding

Larger-than-normal melting snowpack poses a threat to the province as warmer weather touches down

Vancouver-based Doubleview Gold Corp. is developing claims in an area north of Telegraph Creek that occupies an important place in Tahltan oral histories, said Chad Norman Day, president of the Tahltan Central Government. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO)
B.C. Indigenous nation opposes mineral exploration in culturally sensitive area

There’s “no way” the Tahltan would ever support a mine there, says Chad Norman Day, president of its central government

Stz’uminus Elder George Harris, Ladysmith Mayor Aaron Stone, and Stz’uminus Chief Roxanne Harris opened the ceremony. (Cole Schisler photo)
Symbolic red dresses rehung along B.C. highway after vandals tore them down

Leaders from Stz’uminus First Nation and the Town of Ladysmith hung new dresses on Sat. April 17

A Western toadlet crosses the centre line of Elk View Road in Chilliwack on Aug. 26, 2010. A tunnel underneath the road has since been installed to help them migrate cross the road. Saturday, April 24 is Save the Frogs Day. (Jenna Hauck/ Progress File)
Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of April 18 to 24

Save the Frogs Day, Love Your Thighs Day and Scream Day are all coming up this week

Most Read