LETTER: Climate change deniers grasp at straws to support their delusion

Dear editor,

In his fan letter supporting the rants of Tom Fletcher, Bill Metner (Oct. 26) illustrates how climate change deniers will grasp at any straws to support their delusion that global warming should be of little or no concern.

Everything Mr. Metner says is skewed against science. His referencing of a July ’17 National Geographic article on the melting of Antarctica is sketchy, to say the least. I recommend that everyone read the full article and, in consideration of the ominous details of accelerating melt, even in East Antarctica long thought to be climatically inviolate, understand that Mr. Metner, like all denialists, chooses to cherry-pick comments and present them out of context.

The 16 scientists to whom he refers are deeply concerned about how fast polar warming is proceeding, and the article says much about sea level rise this century, the only uncertainty being how fast.

It seems that Mr. Metner cannot comprehend or acknowledge three critical certainties: climate change is worsening (at our great cost); climate change is primarily caused by humanity’s greenhouse gas emissions; and we have very little time to curb emissions before global civilization is itself threatened.

Perhaps he just doesn’t care about the future of the human experiment, of species’ decimation, of ocean acidification, or of an ultimate runaway greenhouse effect such as we see with Venus.

Mr. Metner needs to be reminded that science is a methodology of exceedingly careful observations over time, of astute analyses, and peer-reviewed conclusions that always lean toward the conservative view; that is, not alarmist, but certainly illuminating and perhaps alarming for thinking people.

Any particular avenue of science is not a religion, not a belief but a discipline. Thus it is that climate science, now more than 100 years old, is significant knowledge not to be shunned by denialists who either can’t, won’t, or don’t read the science — or who misunderstand it so profoundly on the basis of limited comprehension — often induced by extremist religion or politics.

Richard Youds

Comox

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Comox Valley dance classes billed as female empowerment tool

New business focuses on ‘promoting positive body image’

New Cumberland fire hall goes to rezoning hearing

Official community plan is also to be amended for the site

Mother bear and two cubs spotted in Crown Isle neighbourhood in Courtenay

Reduce the risk of an interaction by removing potential food sources

Mount Washington to open Dec. 4 with COVID-19 protocols in place

Reservations for some services, face coverings will be required

‘Bad blood’ over pathology issue, says Island Health medical director

Regional hospital district board pushes for pathology service in Courtenay, Campbell River

B.C. or Ontario? Residential school survivors fight move of court battle

It’s now up to Ontario’s Court of Appeal to sort out the venue question

B.C. transportation minister will not seek re-election

Claire Trevena has held the position since 2017

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Body discovered floating in water near Lasqueti Island

JRCC reports personnel aboard fishing vessel made the find

Young B.C. cancer survivor rides 105-km with Terry Fox’s brother

Jacob Bredenhof and Darrell Fox’s cycling trek raises almost $90,000 for cancer research

B.C. migrant, undocumented workers rally for permanent residency program

Rally is part of the Amnesty for Undocumented Workers Campaign led by the Migrant Workers Centre

Preparations underway for pandemic election in Saskatchewan and maybe B.C.

Administrators in B.C. and around the country are also looking to expand voting by mail during the pandemic

Nearly 20 per cent of COVID-19 infections among health-care workers by late July

WHO acknowledged the possibility that COVID-19 might be spread in the air under certain conditions

Ferry riders say lower fares are what’s most needed to improve service

Provincial government announces findings of public engagement process

Most Read