New water metering system promotes usage, not conservation

Dear editor,

Maybe I am not understanding the new water metering system in the CV Regional District.

Or maybe we have all been had.

But I just got my second tri-annual bill and I am not pleased.

I thought the purpose of these meters, which were installed a couple of years ago, but never actually used for billing until this year, was to conserve water.  Good idea. But I fail to understand how the base flat rate helps to this end.

This is how it goes. Instead of an annual flat rate, like in the old days, we are now supposed to pay for what we use, because we have a meter. Just like Hydro. But wait. There is a base flat rate of $88.68 for residential use of up to 60 cubic metres. (The actual consumption rate is $1.4780 per m3). So even if you don’t turn the tap on, you are still going to be billed for 60 m3.

So, I went over the base this period, and was charged for that actual use. I all get that. But I was quite surprised to see my mother’s bill. She lives two blocks away. Her usage was 9.37 m3 which at $1.4780 works out to $13.85. But no, she still has to pay $88.68, even though she did not come close to using the base.

Please explain to me how this system helps people to conserve water. If we had to have the meters installed, we should pay what goes through the meter. Not past the meter and on down the street. Otherwise I may as well tell my mother to let her taps run all day.

So, Regional Director C, please lower the base rate to something logical, like maybe 10 m3. Or eliminate it completely so we just pay per use. It is pretty simple.

James Derry

Regional District C resident

 

Just Posted

MusicFest weekend in the Comox Valley ‘fantastic’

With clear skies and warm temperatures bathing the crowd at the Comox… Continue reading

Island Health announces addition of 38 beds for seniors care in the Comox Valley

17 beds at Comox Valley hospital; 21 beds at St. Joe’s

VIDEO: North Island Hospital heliport flight testing

Island Health, in conjunction with Helijet, tested the heliports Tuesday as part… Continue reading

Campfire ban coming into effect across West Coast

The Coastal Fire Centre says bans will begin on Wednesday

Change of command at HMCS Quadra

Lieutenant Colonel (Lt.-Col.) Allan Dengis assumed command of HMCS Quadra in a… Continue reading

Trudeau asks transport minister to tackle Greyhound’s western pullout

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he’s asked Transport Minister Marc Garneau to find solutions in Greyhound Canada’s absence.

Bob Castle’s Under the Glacier cartoon for July 19, 2018

Bob Castle’s Under the Glacier cartoon for July 19, 2018… Continue reading

Kitten OK after being rescued from underground pipe in B.C.

An adventurous feline has been rescued after getting trapped in an underground pipe in Kamloops, B.C.

A day after back-tracking, Trump defends summit performance

Amid bipartisan condemnation of his embrace of a longtime U.S. enemy, Trump at first sought to end 27 hours of recrimination by delivering a rare admission of error Tuesday.

Thai soccer players rescued from cave meet the media

Members of the Thai youth soccer team who were trapped in a cave have left the hospital where they have been treated since their rescue.

Elon Musk apologizes for calling cave rescue diver a ‘pedo’

Musk called a British diver involved in the Thailand cave rescue a pedophile to his 22.3 million Twitter followers on July 15.

Trudeau shuffles familiar faces, adds new ones to expanded cabinet

Justin Trudeau shuffles his front bench Wednesday to install the roster of ministers that will be entrusted with leading the Liberal team into next year’s election.

Special forces unit to monitor Hells Angels ride on Vancouver Island

Enforcement unit says motorcycle club to hold 35th anniversary ride in Nanaimo

Hub for mental health and addictions treatment opens at B.C. hospital

St. Paul’s Hospital HUB is an acute medical unit that includes 10 patient beds

Most Read