Voting for change while ignoring policies is not wise

Voting for change while ignoring policies is not wise

Dear editor,

Several of our federal political parties are campaigning on the highly unoriginal promise to bring ‘change’ to Canada. A Léger poll released last week suggests that the strategy may be working, with as many as a third of Canadians leaning toward voting for the party that survey participants agree ‘most embodies change’.

Undoubtedly there are times when change is necessary on both personal and national levels. But for a plurality of voters to prefer the party of change raises a serious question about Canadians’ attitudes towards politics.

How many votes in the upcoming election will be decided based on actual matters of policy? With the parties encouraging a desire for change—and none of them is completely free from using this appeal—how many discussions about integrity in government, care in economic management, and prudence in international relations are ignored?

Are we in danger of choosing change for its own sake? Not all change is wrong. But sometimes it is better to step back and let oneself vote based on which politicians are capable of providing effective, reliable government.

Policy debates may not be as interesting as the emotional rhetoric of change. But in the long run, a thoughtful, considered decision may prove better for Canada.

Brendon Johnson

Courtenay