The 15th annual running of the 12 Hours of Cumberland mountain bike race takes place June 23. For details and to register, visit www.unitedridersofcumberland.com.

12 Hours of Cumberland returns June 23

Popular race for all ages, abilities

The 15th annual 12 Hours of Cumberland, one of the Valley’s most popular and sociable mountain bike races, returns to Cumberland Saturday, June 23.

At this popular event hosted by the United Riders of Cumberland (UROC), riders of all ages and abilities are invited to race to complete the most circuits of a racecourse over a 12-hour period. This year’s course is a roughly seven-kilometre loop featuring a selection of “buffed-up classics” like Two and a Juice, Buggered Pig, Entrails, Scat, Brat and Space Nugget.

Riders can compete in the solo category for the prestigious Twelve Hour Cup, or they can vie for a selection of equally coveted Beardsley Pottery mugs as a team of two or four. The option for mixed gender teams makes it an ideal event for riding couples.

“This event is a local favourite for sure, and it always has a really fun, almost festive atmosphere,” says race director Adam Speigel. “The famous UROC Barbecue will be in full effect, and there are lots of sweet prizes to be won, as well as music and activities for the kids. It’s always a fantastic event, and we have no reason to doubt this year will be any different.”

Participants can register at www.unitedridersofcumberland.com. The cost is $50 per rider, although it’s half price for riders 12-16 years and free for those under 12.

All participants must register online, as there will be no race-day registrations.

Race-day check-in and plate pick-up starts at 7 a.m. at Cumberland’s No. 6 Mine Park, which will be home to a lively environment throughout the day for participants and spectators. The race runs from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

All participants must hold either an annual UROC membership ($20) or a Cycling BC race licence. A one-day licence will be available for purchase on race day for $10, although a UROC membership offers the best value by insuring riders for all UROC events while also helping support local trail maintenance and development.

UROC is a non-profit society that promotes and supports the Comox Valley mountain bike community through trail work and advocacy, volunteerism, promotion of the sport and fundraising.

https://unitedridersofcumberland.com/

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