Corporate bullying is still bullying

Dear editor,

In your Nov. 11 paper there were three letters regarding two BC Hydro customers being disconnected from their power supply. Reading these letters and talking to one of these people who have been cut off, another story emerges.

This person elected not to have a “smart” meter for a variety of reasons. Her meter was exchanged without her permission, while she was not home, by the BC Hydro contractor CORIX with a digital meter.

She paid her hydro usage faithfully with every bill received and also the penalty fees for the months Hydro actually read her meter. She received one warning in September that her bill was overdue and she could be disconnected. Without any further warning she got disconnected.

She was home when this happened and she felt bullied, threatened, powerless and violated. It is remarkable to note that BC Hydro decided to disconnect their two customers at this time of the year. It is winter now with temperatures well below zero and long dark nights. I presume as a warning to others who refused to change to a “smart meter”.

BC Hydro is in a powerful position (no pun intended), if we look at the fact that the only way most people can get electricity in their house is through BC Hydro. Also, that most people these days rely on electricity for their water, heat, light, refrigerators, telephones, computer etc,.

BC Hydro picked on two older single women at this time of the year; and one can’t help but to identify this as an act of corporate bullying. This raises the question why our governments are raising awareness about bullying and trying to stop bullying and at the same time allows BC Hydro to commit a clear act of corporate bullying with their customers.

Marlene Smith

Courtenay